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Thread: The Mechanics of the Jab

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  1. #1
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    Default The Mechanics of the Jab

    After watching a video tape of one my bouts and spending some time going through some threads, I realized my mechanics were off with the jab. Please tell me if this is the recommended way:

    1. Weight on back foot. Front foot is for direction and balance. Weight does not get transferred to the front when jabbing. Even when stepping in with the jab, you push from the back foot gliding foreward with the weight still kept back. So is there any weight transfer with the jab?

    2. Elbow to the body. I used to have my elbow flare out slighly, and the angle of my forearm in front of me would be at the 1 O'clock instead of vertical at the 12 O'clock position.

    3. The emphasis of the jab is a combination of a snap of the elbow, rotation of the left hip and shoulder, and the pull back of the right shoulder. I never though of pulling back the back shoulder.

    4. Try to make contact with the left shoulder and the left jaw keeping you chin back not tucked or down on your chest.

    5. The use of elastic rope attaching your feet together to build balance and body awareness. This really showed me how I always had my weight favoring the front foot.

    6. Resistance bands while jabbing. With the tension, do you attach the band on a post in front of you (more resistance at the guard position, less resistance when the jab is extended to help speed extension), or should the bands be attached behind you where there is more tension when the jab is extended so that when you snap it back the extra pull aids return speed. Or do you simply mix it up and do both?

    Thanks in advance for any advice/input. I enjoy this board and the knowledge of the members. If I asked these questions at my gym, the answer would likely include 50% good advice, 20% bad advice, and 30% cursing.

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    Default Re: The Mechanics of the Jab

    On 4, concetrate on pulling the right shoulder and hip back rather than turning the left. The habit stops you reaching and keeps the shoulder above the knee, plus gives more turn on the back foot.
    Pain lasts a only a minute, but the memory will last forever....

    boxingbournemouth - Cornelius Carrs private boxing tuition and personal fitness training

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    Default Re: The Mechanics of the Jab

    Thanks Scrap, that's a better way of thinking about it. Also, when the hand is turned over just shy of impact, is the turn in just the hand itself? Or does the arm rotate with the fist? The latter rotation thus causes the elbow to flare. Is the proper way to try to keep the elbow pointed mostly down through the movement?

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    Default Re: The Mechanics of the Jab

    A good way to practice is standing shoulder against the wall smooth wall. Throwing the Jab and making sure the Hand never leaves the wall, and the shoulder Hitting the Chin. Good way of learning and producing the correct Biomechanics. Couple of minutes you will feel it.
    Pain lasts a only a minute, but the memory will last forever....

    boxingbournemouth - Cornelius Carrs private boxing tuition and personal fitness training

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    Default Re: The Mechanics of the Jab

    Could you maybee explain this a bit clearer scrap as i would like to try this but i dont quite understand what you mean.

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    Default Re: The Mechanics of the Jab

    Stand with your left shoulder against the wall if orthadox, left elbow and fist touching as well. Also left foot all the left side you are looking along the wall. Know keeping everything touching throw the jab along the wall turning the jab as you do 2 minutes you will feel it stand off and give your arm a shake . then give it some more. This will give the muscle correct memory. One thing while doing it turn the fist so the shoulder hits your chin if your shoulder is hitting your chin He isnt
    Pain lasts a only a minute, but the memory will last forever....

    boxingbournemouth - Cornelius Carrs private boxing tuition and personal fitness training

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    Default Re: The Mechanics of the Jab

    One of the things that it helps with is preventing you from bringing your elbow up too soon.
    If you hear a voice within you saying that I am not a painter, then by all means paint and that voice will be silenced.

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    Default Re: The Mechanics of the Jab

    It's kind of difficult to explain but when jabbing correctly should it feel like youre shoulder kind of clicks into place as you turn it over sort of like hitting that little sweet spot i once heard someone describe it like jabbing down a pipe.Am i right in saying that a nice compact jab should also come to the left hand side of the centre line but not past it.For instance if you were standing face on in front of the mirror it it would come to the left hand side of youre chin sort of like where you would rest youre chin if you were to fire a rifle although obviously it would be the opposite side for a righty lol but you know what i mean.

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    Default Re: The Mechanics of the Jab

    In the mirror theres a southpaw in front of you.
    Pain lasts a only a minute, but the memory will last forever....

    boxingbournemouth - Cornelius Carrs private boxing tuition and personal fitness training

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    Default Re: The Mechanics of the Jab

    good point

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    Default Re: The Mechanics of the Jab

    I have also been using a slightly narrower than shoulder width stance and stepping into a s/w stance when i step with the jab if that makes sense.Is this correct or should i be shoulder width before i step?

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    Default Re: The Mechanics of the Jab

    When you start, and when you finish.
    Pain lasts a only a minute, but the memory will last forever....

    boxingbournemouth - Cornelius Carrs private boxing tuition and personal fitness training

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    Default Re: The Mechanics of the Jab

    k i think im overcomlicating things in my head again.Paralysis by analysis

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    Default Re: The Mechanics of the Jab

    hey guys, ive been trying the little tip u suggested scrap and it seems to make sense however when i try to get into position with my left shoulder lead foot touching the wall it seems as if im holding my left hand out wide to my left to get my fist to touch the wall, im just wondering should i turn more into the wall so my hand can touch it without reaching out to the left but also when i try this i cant get my usual stance because the wall is in the way of my lead foot as i fight from quite a low stance usually, could you please help scrap as i think this will lead to perfect form once learnt properly, it feels really wierd now and sort of awkward to jab that way but i guess its just because ive been jabbing wrong for quite some time now and im used to flareing the elbow a bit earlier than is allowed during this exercise i think

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    Default Re: The Mechanics of the Jab

    also i like the idea of pulling the right shoulder back it seems to make everything more crisp and snappier in a way if those words make sense to you hah, i just wondered should i apply this technique to straight right hands aswell sort of pulling the left shoulder back to throw the punch and then pulling the right shoulder back to return to position sharpish? it sort of seems like a good idea to apply this to most punches if possible

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