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Thread: monitoring opponents rear hand (As a Southpaw)

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    Default monitoring opponents rear hand (As a Southpaw)

    As a southpaw the threat of the straight right is always an issue just as my left is to him, was looking for more of the scienece of boxing and ways to monitor his right hand? Eyes,positioning,tricks,or whatever you think I can do to be fully alert,counter,or make him not throw the right hand. Anything from yous would be awesome. Thanks

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    Default Re: monitoring opponents rear hand

    As a southpaw, if you don't want him to throw the right hand, keep circling to your right, away from his.
    Personally, I find a lot of the 'avoid his power hand' stuff to be counter-productive and distracting. In boxing, you generally look to gain the inside punching position. In a match between boxers with opposite stances, you surrender that position by constantly stepping outside his lead foot. I think many southpaws do this because they neglect to develope a strong lead hand and come to rely on their left hand.
    There is a big advantage in going to an opponent's strength- in this case, his straight right or straight left hand. That is, you know what he is going to do. If I'm an orthodox fighter, and a southpaw moves into my right hand, the punch the book says I should be throwing, what will I do? Throw my straight right hand, of course.
    And then you get under it and hit the body with your left uppercut, or beat him to the punch with your right hook. This is the safest way to 'monitor' that punch; get him to throw it when you want him to throw it, then deal with it, and he'll keep doing it because it is what he is 'supposed' to do. It is a lot better than fighting scared, wondering what and when he is going to try.

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    Default Re: monitoring opponents rear hand

    Hey remember Kostya used to hold his left arm out like a feeler to gauge you and make you move either side if it, then he'd turn into your position and seek to throw a right straight down the pipe?

    What would happen to his right hand if you'd shoved his extended left arm towards it (it takes the power out of the intended shot. Only slightly before you move, disrupts their intent You're not meant to deal with arms I know, but a light shove to the lead arm can really help you disrupt them, then move in to their reaction.
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    Default Re: monitoring opponents rear hand

    Quote Originally Posted by Andre View Post
    Hey remember Kostya used to hold his left arm out like a feeler to gauge you and make you move either side if it, then he'd turn into your position and seek to throw a right straight down the pipe?

    What would happen to his right hand if you'd shoved his extended left arm towards it (it takes the power out of the intended shot. Only slightly before you move, disrupts their intent You're not meant to deal with arms I know, but a light shove to the lead arm can really help you disrupt them, then move in to their reaction.
    Can you explain more on this on any kind of video? I never use to watch Kostya fight,was he a southpaw?

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    Default Re: monitoring opponents rear hand

    Ill try and find one on him for you. He only started doing it in his pro career when he was searching for power finishes, he was a totally different; A counter puncher in his amateur days and exceptional at it. He turned hunter as a pro.

    Its just a thought I had, cause he was a natural at dealing with southies.But he used to measure them with his left arm out like a feeler and would gauge distance etc and then throw a right bomb. I was just thinking aloud that to shift his feeler arm would of made him move instead of him making you move, if you get my drift.
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    Default Re: monitoring opponents rear hand

    Watch this from the 5:00 minute mark on. Good fight to watch in any case.

    He uses his lead like a feeler a few times.

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    Default Re: monitoring opponents rear hand

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    Default Re: monitoring opponents rear hand

    Yeah see how he leaves that left arm out there a few times tapping and feeling with it gauging distance, he even uses it to just to get in the way and forces Judah to shoot around it then times Judah off the move.

    I just thought if Judah went at the arm first cause its out there and moved right it may have changed Koystas rhythm/thought process and maybe the fight.
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    Default Re: monitoring opponents rear hand

    I was watching this one:

    I like how he takes that inside position with his left foot and fires that stiff jab and straight right hand at Mitchell

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    Default Re: monitoring opponents rear hand

    Good memories , fuck Judah should have been professional and stayed down and taken a full count then got up. He was addled big mistake getting up early like that.

    Would of ended the same anyway I think.
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    Default Re: monitoring opponents rear hand

    Quote Originally Posted by greynotsoold View Post
    I was watching this one:

    I like how he takes that inside position with his left foot and fires that stiff jab and straight right hand at Mitchell
    Yeah wow, I forgot just how solid on his feet he was too, a real hunter of the opponents center line. loved his way of getting to the inside game, the whole time hes so methodical feeling out, measure distance all for the big right hand you just know is lurking. Menace of a fighter really, he wasnt opposed to some rough housing to get in there either.
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    Default Re: monitoring opponents rear hand

    Interesting. But what does the lead arm "feeler" have to do with avoiding the rear hand?

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    Default Re: monitoring opponents rear hand

    Quote Originally Posted by hma123 View Post
    Interesting. But what does the lead arm "feeler" have to do with avoiding the rear hand?
    When you set out to avoid something, it often ends up happening. Draw that punch- so you'll know when it is coming, as opposed to scurrying around wondering when and where it is- and counter off it. Your right hook should beat his straight right to the mark every time, given that his has the longer distance to travel and, by throwing it, he turns into your hook.
    In the last Pac/Marquez fight, Manny went through contortions to avoid the right hand. Watch the way he was throwing his left and bailing out...only to get conned at the end and get slammed by the punch he had been avoiding.

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    Default Re: monitoring opponents rear hand

    Also, for an exercise that will expand the scope: hold out your jab like a feeler and see if you can throw your rear properly while someone steers your lead arm towards the rear one. You'll find even moving it a couple of inches will stop the rear shots power and make you react differently.
    Thats monitoring the rear arm and with practice you could do it blindfolded no exaggeration. Everything he tries to do with one arm you can feel the intent and slow it through the other one. Best way to disrupt someones balance is to move one of their legs or shift one of their elbows, it also ruins good punching technique. Its not the be all and end all, the situation may not even arise in some fights, its just something to explore and keep in the bank for the right time.
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    Default Re: monitoring opponents rear hand

    Quote Originally Posted by Andre View Post
    Also, for an exercise that will expand the scope: hold out your jab like a feeler and see if you can throw your rear properly while someone steers your lead arm towards the rear one. You'll find even moving it a couple of inches will stop the rear shots power and make you react differently.
    That's true I like this one but how would one go on applying this to a live sparring session?

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