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Thread: RIP Pernell Whitaker

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  1. #16
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    Default Re: RIP Pernell Whitaker

    Very sad to hear this news, i always enjoyed watching him fight just in case somebody actually did hit him? He was a magnificent boxer and the epitome of the old saying "hit and don't get hit".. He made a fool of Chavez and the judges just didn't understand what boxing was all about that night.... R.I.P. Champ.

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    Default Re: RIP Pernell Whitaker

    Extremely sad, sounds like it was just one of those things.

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    Default Re: RIP Pernell Whitaker

    They should overturn the Chavez fight in light of his passing. The literal definition of a robbery.

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    Default Re: RIP Pernell Whitaker

    I live in Hampton Roads, Va, and would see Pea out regularly. He was one of my favorite fighters growing up so I would always make a point to go shake his hand and talk boxing with him. I’m a nobody, and Pernell never once acted too good, or disturbed/annoyed, and would always take the time to talk to me and whoever I was with. Such a great and humble guy.

    I don’t want to turn this into a who was greater post, but I have to say that from my perspective, Pea was the best of his generation (and I realize that is a strong and biased comment). Think of how confident and great he was to move up from 135 to 140 to force the undefeated and great Chavez to fight him (winning a title from a murderous punching Pineda), and then moving up AGAIN to 147 to beat P4P #3 Buddy Mcgirt (behind Chavez and Sweet Pea) to make it happen. He then boxes circles around Chavez, and goes up in weight to fight one of the top two guys at 154 (Terry Norris was likely #1) to win a title. Pure greatness and he was brilliant in the ring.

    R.I.P. champ.

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    Default Re: RIP Pernell Whitaker

    Quote Originally Posted by p4pking View Post
    They should overturn the Chavez fight in light of his passing. The literal definition of a robbery.


    Are you kidding?? That would've given JCC the first loss of his career. Unacceptable!

    Instead..... it was through clenched teeth that the WBC allowed a decision to be awarded to Frankie Randall a couple of fights later. (And that was only 'cause Frankie knocked his ass down).

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    Default Re: RIP Pernell Whitaker

    Quote Originally Posted by TitoFan View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by p4pking View Post
    They should overturn the Chavez fight in light of his passing. The literal definition of a robbery.


    Are you kidding?? That would've given JCC the first loss of his career. Unacceptable!

    Instead..... it was through clenched teeth that the WBC allowed a decision to be awarded to Frankie Randall a couple of fights later. (And that was only 'cause Frankie knocked his ass down).
    Honestly, I don’t think the decision was a travesty. I don’t think it was a good decision, but I could see how a draw could have happened. It’s what I always refer to as a bad decision vs a robbery. A bad decision is where 75% or more viewers score it for one fighter and the other wins. A robbery is when there isn’t really a legitimate case for that fighter to win.

    Examples for both. Both GGG and Canelo fights. I could see be results but a majority of fans disagreed with the results. Those were both bad decisions. A robbery is like Paul Williams against Erislandy Lara. There is no way to legitimately give Williams enough rounds to win that fight.

    Don’t get confused and think that I thought that Chavez beat Pernell. I had Pernell winning, but there were some close rounds that I could see how a draw could have been scored if you gave Chavez the benefit of the doubt on most rounds.

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    Default Re: RIP Pernell Whitaker

    Quote Originally Posted by powerpuncher View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by TitoFan View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by p4pking View Post
    They should overturn the Chavez fight in light of his passing. The literal definition of a robbery.


    Are you kidding?? That would've given JCC the first loss of his career. Unacceptable!

    Instead..... it was through clenched teeth that the WBC allowed a decision to be awarded to Frankie Randall a couple of fights later. (And that was only 'cause Frankie knocked his ass down).
    Honestly, I don’t think the decision was a travesty. I don’t think it was a good decision, but I could see how a draw could have happened. It’s what I always refer to as a bad decision vs a robbery. A bad decision is where 75% or more viewers score it for one fighter and the other wins. A robbery is when there isn’t really a legitimate case for that fighter to win.

    Examples for both. Both GGG and Canelo fights. I could see be results but a majority of fans disagreed with the results. Those were both bad decisions. A robbery is like Paul Williams against Erislandy Lara. There is no way to legitimately give Williams enough rounds to win that fight.

    Don’t get confused and think that I thought that Chavez beat Pernell. I had Pernell winning, but there were some close rounds that I could see how a draw could have been scored if you gave Chavez the benefit of the doubt on most rounds.


    Point well taken. But I still feel that Chavez's undefeated record weighed HEAVILY in the minds of the judges.

    It was also in San Antonio, Texas....... and for JCC's WBC welterweight title. Talk about a stacked deck.............

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    Default Re: RIP Pernell Whitaker

    Quote Originally Posted by TitoFan View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by powerpuncher View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by TitoFan View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by p4pking View Post
    They should overturn the Chavez fight in light of his passing. The literal definition of a robbery.


    Are you kidding?? That would've given JCC the first loss of his career. Unacceptable!

    Instead..... it was through clenched teeth that the WBC allowed a decision to be awarded to Frankie Randall a couple of fights later. (And that was only 'cause Frankie knocked his ass down).
    Honestly, I don’t think the decision was a travesty. I don’t think it was a good decision, but I could see how a draw could have happened. It’s what I always refer to as a bad decision vs a robbery. A bad decision is where 75% or more viewers score it for one fighter and the other wins. A robbery is when there isn’t really a legitimate case for that fighter to win.

    Examples for both. Both GGG and Canelo fights. I could see be results but a majority of fans disagreed with the results. Those were both bad decisions. A robbery is like Paul Williams against Erislandy Lara. There is no way to legitimately give Williams enough rounds to win that fight.

    Don’t get confused and think that I thought that Chavez beat Pernell. I had Pernell winning, but there were some close rounds that I could see how a draw could have been scored if you gave Chavez the benefit of the doubt on most rounds.


    Point well taken. But I still feel that Chavez's undefeated record weighed HEAVILY in the minds of the judges.

    It was also in San Antonio, Texas....... and for JCC's WBC welterweight title. Talk about a stacked deck.............
    Nah dude, just absolutely not. You can justify seeing a draw if you have NO idea about boxing, but otherwise its nothing but a sham.

  9. #24
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    Default Re: RIP Pernell Whitaker

    one of the best to ever do it. rip sweetpea
    Apply shame. Apply fame. The crook and the flail.

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    Default Re: RIP Pernell Whitaker

    Very sad to hear this. He gave so much to the fight community!
    Bigger man George, bigger punch!

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    Default Re: RIP Pernell Whitaker

    Pernell Whitaker obituary

    During debates about who is the best boxer of all time, the former four-weight world champion Pernell “Sweet Pea” Whitaker is sometimes overlooked. He was not a fearsome puncher, nor was he a braggart who commanded headlines in the era before social media when newspaper reporters treasured outrageous quotes to sell a fight. But his peers always rated him among the sport’s elite.

    Whitaker, who has died aged 55 after being hit by a car while crossing a road in his hometown of Virginia Beach, Virginia, was an Olympic gold medallist for the US at the Los Angeles games of 1984, after which he turned professional, first becoming a world champion as a lightweight in 1989. He eventually quit boxing in 2001, having fought in a total of 23 world title contests, of which he lost only three and drew one, in hugely controversial circumstances against the Mexican fighter Julio César Chávez.

    One of his beaten opponents was the Scot Gary Jacobs, who challenged Whitaker for the WBC welterweight title in Atlantic City in August 1995. Jacobs had reigned as a British, Commonwealth and European champion but, like so many others, found Whitaker’s southpaw style and brilliant defensive skills almost impossible to fathom and he lost widely on points.

    After learning of his old adversary’s death, Jacobs said: “If you want to learn boxing, watch his fights. His ringcraft was just incredible. He was so clever. He was almost impossible to hit cleanly. His skills were truly remarkable. People talk about great fighters, particularly at lightweight with men like Roberto Durán and Floyd Mayweather, but I think that he was the best of the lot.”

    The former world heavyweight champion George Foreman said: “It was like watching a cat with boxing gloves. The best balance I ever saw in a boxer.”

    Born in the tough Virginia coastal city of Norfolk, best known for its military bases, Pernell was one of seven children. His parents, Raymond and Novella, encouraged their son to pursue sports and he first went to a boxing gym aged eight, when it was quickly apparent that young Pernell had an aptitude for it. He was known to his family as Pete, after one of his uncles, and at an early boxing show, Whitaker’s mother had been calling out the name “Sweet Pete” only to see it misreported in a local newspaper as “Sweet Pea”. Ever thereafter, it seems, the name stuck.

    Whitaker claimed to have had more than 500 contests as an amateur before his Olympic success. In 1984 he was captain of a US team that included Evander Holyfield, Mark Breland, Meldrick Taylor and Frank Tate, all medallists who would go on to become professional world champions.



    Whitaker turned pro under the promotion and management of the Duva family, and was trained by the extrovert patriarch Lou. After a run of 15 straight wins, he lost on a dubious points decision in a world lightweight title challenge in France in 1988, but scored a convincing points victory over Greg Haugen to become the IBF lightweight champion the following year.

    The win marked the beginning of Whitaker’s era of glory. By the time he fought Chávez in 1993, in front of a 60,000 crowd at the Alamodome in San Antonio, Texas, he had recorded 17 straight victories and had been a world champion at three weights – lightweight, super lightweight and welterweight. Defending the WBC welterweight title against a man who was undefeated in 87 professional contests, Whitaker was awarded a majority draw in an outrageous judging decision when virtually every ringside expert believed Whitaker had won clearly. Whitaker’s verdict was unequivocal: “I whipped his ass.”

    In 1995 he took the WBA super welterweight title, but alcohol and drug problems blighted the later stages of his career. After losing his welterweight world title on points in another disputed decision to Oscar De La Hoya in 1997, he was banned from the sport after testing positive for cocaine, and lost again on points in 1999 to the Puerto Rican Félix Trinidad in his comeback for a final world title contest. In all, Whitaker won 40 pro fights, lost four and drew one with one no contest.

    After retiring, he worked sporadically as a coach. He was sent to prison in 2003 for violating the terms of a probation order imposed for cocaine possession. As the fortune he earned in boxing was frittered away, he once more was in the headlines in 2014 when he won a court order to have his mother and two of his siblings evicted from a house he had bought 30 years earlier so that he could sell the property to cope with his mounting debts.

    His marriage, to his childhood sweetheart, Rovanda Anthony, whom he wed in a boxing ring in Virginia Beach in 1985, ended in divorce. He is survived by his mother, and by three sons, Dominique, Dantavious and Devon, and a daughter, Tiara. Another son, Pernell Jr, predeceased him.

    • Pernell Whitaker, boxer, born 2 January 1964; died 14 July 2019

    https://uk.sports.yahoo.com/news/per...143805345.html
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  12. #27
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    Default Re: RIP Pernell Whitaker

    RIP brother an ATG

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