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Thread: Joe Joyce

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    Default Joe Joyce

    He is mandatory no?

    Is this after a rematch or before?

    Anyhow. I like the Juggernaut but I don't see how he wins against Usyk.

    Speed being the main factor.

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    Default Re: Joe Joyce

    Oddly enough Joyce is mandatory for WBO and Dubois is for WBA. So both could demand their match but could accept step aside money if the offer is good.
    Do not let success go to your head and do not let failure get to your heart.

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    Default Re: Joe Joyce

    There was a part of me that quietly gave Joyce a shot against Usyk. I don't think the WBSS fight was quite the blowout people call it. Joyce won some rounds for me. Based on what we saw Saturday though Usysk would do as he pleases. That said. Joyce will give it everything. There won't be any question marks over his tactics or appetite.
    When God said to the both of us "Which one of you wants to be Sugar Ray?" I guess I didnt raise my hand fast enough

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    Default Re: Joe Joyce

    Having thought about it a little. I actually can see a way for big Joe to win.

    A test of chin. If he can be brute enough to take punches to land punches with the constant pressure and stomping forward that we have seen. It may be possible to break Usyk down.

    I imagine a lot of chasing him round the ring loosing rounds, but if the Juggernaut can weather him down with that crunching jab constantly making Usyk move, one or two might clip him and force him in to a corner for some George Forman style hooks to the head and body with power to break defence.

    Ey there's a chance!

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    Default Re: Joe Joyce

    Joyce to get Olympic gold after fix probe into his loss to at Rio 2016

    One of the most scandalous results in Olympic boxing history, which saw British fighter Joe Joyce denied gold at Rio 2016, is likely to be overturned after sport's top criminal investigator delivers a report into whether the competition was rigged on Thursday.

    Joyce seemed to have outboxed Frenchman Tony Yoka in the super-heavyweight final and be heading for the same professional career that Anthony Joshua started four years earlier.

    Yoka's arm was raised instead, to widespread astonishment in the world of boxing. But Sportsmail understands that the Joyce result will feature in Thursday's report published by Richard McLaren — whose revelations about Russia's state-sponsored doping programme saw that country barred from competition.

    The investigation by McLaren and his team centres on whether boxers of certain nationalities were favoured by referees and judges in Rio.

    Among those investigated are France and Uzbekistan, which won more bouts than the best boxing nations.

    It's not yet clear whether Joyce's silver medal will be upgraded to gold if the result is overturned as expected.

    McLaren's team were called in when an internal probe by the International Boxing Association (AIBA) found 'strong suspicion' surrounding AIBA's French former executive director Karim Bouzidi and a number of referees and judges.

    McLaren's report is also expected to question the decision which saw Russian fighter Vladimir Nikitin handed a farcical victory over Ireland's Michael Conlan to win bronze in Rio.

    There were British jeers among the cheers but Joe Joyce was not so much robbed in Rio as having his pocket picked by a tricky Frenchman.

    The giant hope for a super-heavyweight gold medal to put the finishing touch to Team GB's record breaking Games was teased out of the final decision of these Games.

    Sadly, there was no call for another of the gymnastic somersaults in the ring with which Joyce had entertained the audiences in Pavilion 6 at Riocentro after his preceding victories.

    It was to be Tony Yoka who made his own piece of history by adding an Olympic title to the gold won by his partner Estelle Mossely the night before.

    The family that prays together, slays together.

    This fight was close enough to be a split decision but in reality it was as good as over by the end of the second round.

    Yoka was ahead by then on two of the cards, leaving Joyce already in need of the knock-out which is his trademark but never looked like coming.

    Yoka had called Joyce a robot, among sundry slights about his intelligence, and expressed confidence that he would win.

    No doubt he feels he proved himself right, although Joyce said: 'I can't believe he celebrated so wild after I feel I battered him.'

    Joyce did throw more of the punches but Yoka's accuracy largely deleted this one from the realm of controversy which has plagued some of the judging earlier in this tournament.

    When asked if this verdict came into that category, Joyce mused: 'Possibly. You can be the judges of that. I felt I dominated enough, got through his guard and worked him to the head and body enough to win the gold medal.'

    Anthony Joshua, who he will follow into the professional ranks at the age of 30, was convinced he had won and Joyce said: 'That's a consolation but it's not the same as being Olympic champion. Although I am proud to be the last British medalist, the one who took us to this fantastic medal total.'

    For the British team this was a bitter-sweet moment.

    Their cake was mountainously iced already. The cherry was hauled to the summit by Steam Train Joe and planted there with an iron fist.

    The Olympic fruit turned out to be silver-plated, not dusted in gold, but in the grander scheme of things it was welcome nonetheless.

    The 67th and final gong of Britain's phenomenal Games was delivered with a thunder-clap on a rainy day in Rio by the big men of the Olympic ring.

    Unfortunately Joyce could not generate quite enough of the lightning he needed to shock the rival who had beaten him on the way to winning last year's world amateur championship.

    How close did he come? If this had been a pro fight I would probably have scored it a draw.

    Joyce has been nicknamed Steam Train by Joshua, his London comrade in gloves.

    It is the perfect prefix for his uncompromising, uncomplicated approach to boxing. He keeps pounding along the tracks until he mows his opponents down, or crashes into the buffers.

    Not for the first time, in the eyes of the officials, Yoka shunted him into the sidings.

    When Joyce joins IBF world heavyweight champion Joshua in the professional ranks, the twain shall surely meet in due course. Not that they will do so as strangers. AJ and JJ have sparred thousands of rounds, helping each other towards their literally lofty ambitions.

    Joyce, now that he has been nudge off the peak of Olympia, has further to travel.

    There was to be no back-flip along the way. Just a crashing let down.

    https://www.msn.com/en-gb/sport/boxi...cid=entnewsntp
    Do not let success go to your head and do not let failure get to your heart.

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    Default Re: Joe Joyce

    Quote Originally Posted by Master View Post
    Joyce to get Olympic gold after fix probe into his loss to at Rio 2016

    One of the most scandalous results in Olympic boxing history, which saw British fighter Joe Joyce denied gold at Rio 2016, is likely to be overturned after sport's top criminal investigator delivers a report into whether the competition was rigged on Thursday.

    Joyce seemed to have outboxed Frenchman Tony Yoka in the super-heavyweight final and be heading for the same professional career that Anthony Joshua started four years earlier.

    Yoka's arm was raised instead, to widespread astonishment in the world of boxing. But Sportsmail understands that the Joyce result will feature in Thursday's report published by Richard McLaren — whose revelations about Russia's state-sponsored doping programme saw that country barred from competition.

    The investigation by McLaren and his team centres on whether boxers of certain nationalities were favoured by referees and judges in Rio.

    Among those investigated are France and Uzbekistan, which won more bouts than the best boxing nations.

    It's not yet clear whether Joyce's silver medal will be upgraded to gold if the result is overturned as expected.

    McLaren's team were called in when an internal probe by the International Boxing Association (AIBA) found 'strong suspicion' surrounding AIBA's French former executive director Karim Bouzidi and a number of referees and judges.

    McLaren's report is also expected to question the decision which saw Russian fighter Vladimir Nikitin handed a farcical victory over Ireland's Michael Conlan to win bronze in Rio.

    There were British jeers among the cheers but Joe Joyce was not so much robbed in Rio as having his pocket picked by a tricky Frenchman.

    The giant hope for a super-heavyweight gold medal to put the finishing touch to Team GB's record breaking Games was teased out of the final decision of these Games.

    Sadly, there was no call for another of the gymnastic somersaults in the ring with which Joyce had entertained the audiences in Pavilion 6 at Riocentro after his preceding victories.

    It was to be Tony Yoka who made his own piece of history by adding an Olympic title to the gold won by his partner Estelle Mossely the night before.

    The family that prays together, slays together.

    This fight was close enough to be a split decision but in reality it was as good as over by the end of the second round.

    Yoka was ahead by then on two of the cards, leaving Joyce already in need of the knock-out which is his trademark but never looked like coming.

    Yoka had called Joyce a robot, among sundry slights about his intelligence, and expressed confidence that he would win.

    No doubt he feels he proved himself right, although Joyce said: 'I can't believe he celebrated so wild after I feel I battered him.'

    Joyce did throw more of the punches but Yoka's accuracy largely deleted this one from the realm of controversy which has plagued some of the judging earlier in this tournament.

    When asked if this verdict came into that category, Joyce mused: 'Possibly. You can be the judges of that. I felt I dominated enough, got through his guard and worked him to the head and body enough to win the gold medal.'

    Anthony Joshua, who he will follow into the professional ranks at the age of 30, was convinced he had won and Joyce said: 'That's a consolation but it's not the same as being Olympic champion. Although I am proud to be the last British medalist, the one who took us to this fantastic medal total.'

    For the British team this was a bitter-sweet moment.

    Their cake was mountainously iced already. The cherry was hauled to the summit by Steam Train Joe and planted there with an iron fist.

    The Olympic fruit turned out to be silver-plated, not dusted in gold, but in the grander scheme of things it was welcome nonetheless.

    The 67th and final gong of Britain's phenomenal Games was delivered with a thunder-clap on a rainy day in Rio by the big men of the Olympic ring.

    Unfortunately Joyce could not generate quite enough of the lightning he needed to shock the rival who had beaten him on the way to winning last year's world amateur championship.

    How close did he come? If this had been a pro fight I would probably have scored it a draw.

    Joyce has been nicknamed Steam Train by Joshua, his London comrade in gloves.

    It is the perfect prefix for his uncompromising, uncomplicated approach to boxing. He keeps pounding along the tracks until he mows his opponents down, or crashes into the buffers.

    Not for the first time, in the eyes of the officials, Yoka shunted him into the sidings.

    When Joyce joins IBF world heavyweight champion Joshua in the professional ranks, the twain shall surely meet in due course. Not that they will do so as strangers. AJ and JJ have sparred thousands of rounds, helping each other towards their literally lofty ambitions.

    Joyce, now that he has been nudge off the peak of Olympia, has further to travel.

    There was to be no back-flip along the way. Just a crashing let down.

    https://www.msn.com/en-gb/sport/boxi...cid=entnewsntp
    So at the same time are they going to give AJ’s gold to Cammarelle, who he clearly lost to in the final? Or are they gonna give it to the Cuban who completely destroyed AJ in the quarters.
    Former Undisputed 4 belt Prediction champion. Still P4P and People’s Champion.

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    Default Re: Joe Joyce

    Rio Olympics: System to manipulate outcome of boxing matches by officials in place at 2016 Games

    A system to manipulate the outcome of boxing matches by officials was in place at the Rio 2016 Olympics, an independent investigation has found.

    Professor Richard McLaren, the head of the investigation commissioned by the sport's world governing body AIBA, said the "seeds had been sown" years before.

    "Suspicious" bouts included defeats for Great Britain's Joe Joyce and Ireland's Michael Conlan.

    The AIBA said it noted the investigation's reports with "concern".

    The investigation also reported that qualifiers for the 2016 Games were the "practice ground" in which manipulation methods were "fine-tuned".

    The investigation found there were two bouts that "caused the system to publicly collapse" - including the bantamweight quarter-final between Conlan and Vladimir Nikitin from Russia.

    Conlan was the reigning world and European champion at the time, and his defeat led to public outcry after he had appeared to win the bout comfortably.

    The other was the gold medal heavyweight match between Russia's Evgeny Tischenko and Kazakhstan's Vasily Levit.

    The findings also call into question the final of the men's super heavyweight division between Joyce and France's Tony Yoka, in which Joyce won silver.

    The investigation indicates there were approximately 11 bouts in total that were "suspicious" - and there "may be others".


    "I'm delighted," Conlan told BBC Sport NI. "It's five years on and has been a long time coming. I didn't expect this to happen.

    "The fact it has been done and my fight has been called up - it's not news to me but it's good news. It's a massive day for boxing and for Olympic sport.

    "The black mark of Rio will always be there and I think if I hadn't said what I said and done what I did this probably wouldn't be happening now.

    "I think it's a huge day for amateur boxing and especially for the guys who suffered in Rio, including myself. It is vindication."

    Ex-president 'bears ultimate responsibility'
    Professor McLaren was appointed to investigate the Rio 2016 allegations in June as part of the AIBA's steps - under new president Umar Kremlev - to reform the sport.

    After an investigation by the International Olympic Committee, the IOC suspended the AIBA in 2017, banning it from organising the Tokyo 2020 boxing competition.

    Professor McLaren - who investigated state-sponsored doping in Russia - found the manipulation structure within the AIBA was made possible because key personnel decided the rules did not apply to them.

    He said the AIBA's then-president Wu Ching-kuo "bears ultimate responsibility for the failures of officiating at Rio and the qualifying events", and that Wu was supported by his executive director Karim Bouzidi in Rio.

    "The executive director seized powers belonging to the permanent commissions. The commissions would let this happen as did the president," said McLaren.

    "Once having acquired the power, he would oversee the appointment of referees and judges (R&Js) that knew what was going on but would comply with the manipulation or who were incompetent but wanted to continue as an R&J so were willing to comply or turn a blind eye to what was going on."

    Wu was handed a lifetime ban by the AIBA in 2018.

    "Boxing has a problem, it's not about the rules and processes. It's a people problem. For too long people have worked outside the rules," said McLaren.

    In a short period of time, the AIBA changed its R&J system from judges being nominated by their own international federations, to an accredited 1-3 star system with the later addition of seven independently contracted 5-star permanent R&Js.

    This led to "poorly trained" R&Js being "preyed upon by those who had corrupt motives".

    In Rio, the executive director selected all of the R&Js. Corrupt members of the draw commission would influence the selection process, "so that the 'right' R&Js were in a position to officiate the bout as directed".

    In a statement, president Kremlev said: "I am determined to ensure that boxers receive a fair fight. This determination is demonstrated by AIBA's clear commitment to uncovering the truth and acting on it.


    "We must now carefully examine the report and see what steps are needed to ensure justice. What is important is that we make sure the mechanisms are in place to show that results are above suspicion."

    Further reports on the investigation will be provided in November and then March 2022.

    "AIBA hired Professor McLaren because we have nothing to hide," added president Kremlev. "We will work to incorporate any helpful recommendations that are made. We will also take legal advice with regard to what action is possible against those found to have participated in any manipulation.

    "There should be no place in the AIBA family for anyone who has fixed a fight."

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/boxing/58747880
    Do not let success go to your head and do not let failure get to your heart.

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    Default Re: Joe Joyce

    Meant as a compliment Joyce reminds me of a top form Ray Mercer with much more reach.

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    Default Re: Joe Joyce

    Michael Conlan calls for corrupt boxing officials to face criminal charges

    The Irish boxer Michael Conlan, whose hugely controversial quarter-final defeat at the 2016 Olympics is now formally suspected of being fixed, has called for those implicated in manipulating bouts in Rio to face criminal charges for sporting fraud.

    Speaking to the Guardian after reading Professor Richard McLaren’s devastating investigation into corruption in amateur boxing, Conlan also urged the sport’s governing body, Aiba, to award him the Olympic medal that he believes was robbed from him when he lost to the Russian Vladimir Nikitin.

    “I was reigning world champion, the number one seed, and favourite for gold in Rio and I had my dream ripped away from me - how do you put a price on that?” he told the Guardian. “To be honest I had put it to bed, but reading the report has given me hope of justice.

    “But for justice to be served it won’t be enough for anyone involved in corruption to be kicked out of the sport,” he said. “This is white-collar crime. This is sporting fraud. Those involved should be charged as criminals.”

    “After I called Aiba corrupt in Rio, they fined me 10,000 Swiss francs for speaking out,” he added. “I never paid it, but if I ever want to work in amateur boxing as a coach or trainer I would have to give them the money before returning.

    “How can it be right that I am fined for speaking the truth and reacting like any normal person would – while those responsible for corruption may not face anything like that?”

    McLaren’s damning report found that a handpicked team of five-star referees and judges – the highest possible rank in the sport – used signals at ringside, or instructed other colleagues on the morning of fights, as to who should win a particular match.

    He also found that the corruption went right to the top with two senior Aiba officials – Wu Ching-Kuo and Karim Bouzidi, then Aiba President and executive director, respectively - being “key actors” in “allowing the manipulation to flourish.”

    Speaking in Lausanne on Thursday, McLaren confirmed that defeats for Great Britain’s Joe Joyce in the super-heavyweight final against France’s Tony Yoka and Conlan’s loss in his bantamweight quarter-final against the Russian Vladimir Nikitin were bouts under investigation.

    That did not surprise Conlan, who now wants justice. “My message to Aiba is that I want my medal and I know I deserve it. They robbed me of the chance of gold, and there’s no way you could give me it now because I never got to compete in a semi-final or final. But I think the right decision would be for Aiba to overturn all bouts McLaren says were affected by corruption – which would mean I get the bronze.”

    In 2017 Aiba said that none of its seven five-star judges would ever officiate at international level again, while Wu was banned a year later. Bouzidi has also since left amateur boxing. McLaren will present two further reports in November and next March, which will recommend the sporting sanctions for those found responsible.

    “There will be an awful lot of decisions to overturn for history to be put right, including the result of Joe Joyce’s super-heavyweight gold medal fight,” added Conlan. But that is the only answer.”

    The Irish fighter, who is now an unbeaten professional who recently won the WBA interim featherweight belt, also confirmed to the Guardian that he would be delighted to meet with McLaren’s team of investigators to tell him what he knows. But he said that none of what he had heard so far had shocked him.

    “No, no, no,” he said. “I know what those judges look like. I remember them all in their little clique. None of what McLaren found surprised me.”

    https://www.msn.com/en-gb/sport/boxi...cid=entnewsntp
    Do not let success go to your head and do not let failure get to your heart.

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    Default Re: Joe Joyce

    Quote Originally Posted by Master View Post
    Michael Conlan calls for corrupt boxing officials to face criminal charges

    The Irish boxer Michael Conlan, whose hugely controversial quarter-final defeat at the 2016 Olympics is now formally suspected of being fixed, has called for those implicated in manipulating bouts in Rio to face criminal charges for sporting fraud.

    Speaking to the Guardian after reading Professor Richard McLaren’s devastating investigation into corruption in amateur boxing, Conlan also urged the sport’s governing body, Aiba, to award him the Olympic medal that he believes was robbed from him when he lost to the Russian Vladimir Nikitin.

    “I was reigning world champion, the number one seed, and favourite for gold in Rio and I had my dream ripped away from me - how do you put a price on that?” he told the Guardian. “To be honest I had put it to bed, but reading the report has given me hope of justice.

    “But for justice to be served it won’t be enough for anyone involved in corruption to be kicked out of the sport,” he said. “This is white-collar crime. This is sporting fraud. Those involved should be charged as criminals.”

    “After I called Aiba corrupt in Rio, they fined me 10,000 Swiss francs for speaking out,” he added. “I never paid it, but if I ever want to work in amateur boxing as a coach or trainer I would have to give them the money before returning.

    “How can it be right that I am fined for speaking the truth and reacting like any normal person would – while those responsible for corruption may not face anything like that?”

    McLaren’s damning report found that a handpicked team of five-star referees and judges – the highest possible rank in the sport – used signals at ringside, or instructed other colleagues on the morning of fights, as to who should win a particular match.

    He also found that the corruption went right to the top with two senior Aiba officials – Wu Ching-Kuo and Karim Bouzidi, then Aiba President and executive director, respectively - being “key actors” in “allowing the manipulation to flourish.”

    Speaking in Lausanne on Thursday, McLaren confirmed that defeats for Great Britain’s Joe Joyce in the super-heavyweight final against France’s Tony Yoka and Conlan’s loss in his bantamweight quarter-final against the Russian Vladimir Nikitin were bouts under investigation.

    That did not surprise Conlan, who now wants justice. “My message to Aiba is that I want my medal and I know I deserve it. They robbed me of the chance of gold, and there’s no way you could give me it now because I never got to compete in a semi-final or final. But I think the right decision would be for Aiba to overturn all bouts McLaren says were affected by corruption – which would mean I get the bronze.”

    In 2017 Aiba said that none of its seven five-star judges would ever officiate at international level again, while Wu was banned a year later. Bouzidi has also since left amateur boxing. McLaren will present two further reports in November and next March, which will recommend the sporting sanctions for those found responsible.

    “There will be an awful lot of decisions to overturn for history to be put right, including the result of Joe Joyce’s super-heavyweight gold medal fight,” added Conlan. But that is the only answer.”

    The Irish fighter, who is now an unbeaten professional who recently won the WBA interim featherweight belt, also confirmed to the Guardian that he would be delighted to meet with McLaren’s team of investigators to tell him what he knows. But he said that none of what he had heard so far had shocked him.

    “No, no, no,” he said. “I know what those judges look like. I remember them all in their little clique. None of what McLaren found surprised me.”

    https://www.msn.com/en-gb/sport/boxi...cid=entnewsntp
    So you’ve basically copied, pasted and posted 3 x 20,000 word posts about the same thing . (Might be slight differences, I couldn’t be bothered to read it tbh.)
    We get it, they’re looking into some dodgy results. What about London 2012?
    Former Undisputed 4 belt Prediction champion. Still P4P and People’s Champion.

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    Default Re: Joe Joyce

    It is different, read it.
    Do not let success go to your head and do not let failure get to your heart.

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